Surficial-geologic map, Alaska Highway corridor, Delta Junction to Dot Lake, Alaska

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Frequently-anticipated questions:


What does this data set describe?

Title:
Surficial-geologic map, Alaska Highway corridor, Delta Junction to Dot Lake, Alaska
Abstract:
During 2006 and 2007 the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys conducted reconnaissance surficial-geologic mapping in segment 1 of the Alaska Highway corridor, which straddles the Alaska Highway through the Tanana River valley from Delta Junction to the eastern boundary of the Mt. Hayes Quadrangle. Surficial-geologic deposits were initially mapped by interpreting ~1:63,360-scale, false-color infrared aerial photographs taken in August 1980 and field verified in 2006-2007.
Supplemental_Information:
The layers listed below are present as ArcGIS shape files. To enhance print quality, this publication utilized a vector topography data set. The topography data set is not included with this release. Attribute information for the following layers (entities) is included in this metadata file under the "Entity_and_Attribute_Information" section. There are 6 layers. Each layer is listed and described in detail under its own heading starting "Entity_Type_Label."Layers include:
surf_geology	polygons of surficial-geologic map units
faults	trace of known active faults discussed in PIR 2008-3d
escarpment	trace of prominent escarpments discussed in text
soilpits	locations of soil pits discussed in the text
radiocarbon	locations of radiocarbon samples discussed in text
outline	outline shape of the study area
  1. How should this data set be cited?

    Reger, R.D., Stevens, D.S.P., and Solie, D.N., 200812, Surficial-geologic map, Alaska Highway corridor, Delta Junction to Dot Lake, Alaska: Preliminary Interpretive Report PIR 2008-3A, State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks, Alaska - USA.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details: 35 p., 2 sheets, scale 1:63,360

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?

    West_Bounding_Coordinate: -145.947285
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -143.936074
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 64.126215
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 63.497248

  3. What does it look like?

  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?

    Calendar_Date: 1969
    Currentness_Reference: ground condition

  5. What is the general form of this data set?

    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: vector digital data

  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?

    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?

      This is a Vector data set.

    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?

      Grid_Coordinate_System_Name: Universal Transverse Mercator
      Universal_Transverse_Mercator:
      UTM_Zone_Number: 6
      Transverse_Mercator:
      Scale_Factor_at_Central_Meridian: 0.999600
      Longitude_of_Central_Meridian: -147.000000
      Latitude_of_Projection_Origin: 0
      False_Easting: 500000.0
      False_Northing: 0

      Planar coordinates are encoded using coordinate pair
      Abscissae (x-coordinates) are specified to the nearest 0.000000001
      Ordinates (y-coordinates) are specified to the nearest 0.000000001
      Planar coordinates are specified in meters

      The horizontal datum used is North American Datum of 1927.
      The ellipsoid used is Clarke 1866.
      The semi-major axis of the ellipsoid used is 6378206.4.
      The flattening of the ellipsoid used is 1/294.978698.

  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?

    outline.shp
    polygon outlining boundary of map area (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Shape
    shape of polygon outlining map boundary (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    shape of map area

    surf_geology.shp
    polygons representing surficial-geologic map units (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    unit_label
    Map unit label shown on map and described in text and codeset.pdf (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Formal codeset
    Codeset Name:PIR2008-3A_codeset.pdf
    Codeset Source:Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys <http://www.dggs.dnr.state.ak.us/metadata/PIR2008-3A_codeset.pdf>

    faults.shp
    Trace of identified active faults (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    fault_type
    Type of fault (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Type of fault as represented by line symbol on map

    name
    Name of fault (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Name of fault shown on map: Dot "T" Johnson fault (Granite Mountain and Dot Lake segments), Canteen fault, Panoramic fault

    escarpment.shp
    Trace of prominent escarpments discussed in text (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    name
    Name of escarpment (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Escarpment name: Clearwater Lake escarpment, Gerstle-Clearwater escarpment, Dot Lake Village escarpment

    type
    Type of escarpment as represented by line type on map (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    observed location or approximately located escarpment

    soilpits.shp
    location of soilpits discussed in text (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Soil_Pit_S
    Label of individual soilpits shown on map (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Soil pit label: SP-1, SP-2, SP-3, SP-4, SP-5

    Northing
    Northing of soil pit location (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:7057387.085
    Maximum:7079152.105
    Units:meters

    Easting
    Easting of soil pit location (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:581647.801
    Maximum:626929.894
    Units:meters

    radiocarbon.shp
    Location of radiocarbon samples described in text (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Radiocarbo
    Radiocarbon sample number (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    RC-1, RC-2, RC-3

    Northing
    Northing of radiocarbon sample location (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:7066480.506
    Maximum:7072241.128
    Units:meters

    Easting
    Easting of radiocarbon sample location (Source: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys)

    Range of values
    Minimum:605243.687
    Maximum:645960.985
    Units:meters


Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)

  2. Who also contributed to the data set?

    This research was supported by Alaska State Capital Improvement Projects funding.Additional Acknowledgments: Mapping of surficial geology in the vicinity of the Clearwater Lake escarpment and its intersection with the trans-Alaska oil pipeline was accomplished in the mid 1970s in collaboration with Alyeska Pipeline Service Company, who released a report that includes data on near-surface stratigraphy and radiocarbon dates and provides evidence that the Clearwater Lake escarpment is not fault related (Alyeska Pipeline Service Company, 1976). We gratefully acknowledge the cooperation provided by Mike Metz and Alyeska. We also appreciate the logistical support and interest of Steve Squires and the rest of the Dry Creek community, who supplied us with fresh vegetables, excellent drinking water, and the log of their water well. Several other colleagues have collaborated in our study of this initial segment of the proposed pipeline corridor. Gary Carver brought his outstanding expertise in neotectonics of the central and eastern Alaska Range to the DGGS effort and provided enthusiastic leadership during the fault-trenching program. Tom Hamilton provided his unpublished report on the glacial history of the area and graciously allowed us to release his unpublished radiocarbon dates from the Gerstle River, Little Gerstle River, and Johnson River drainages. Tom Ager provided early black-and-white aerial photographs and discussed his interpretation of climatic changes in the corridor. Field visits with Dave Carter, John Galloway, and Florence Weber examined evidence of the oldest known glaciation in the corridor and first alerted us to the possibility of massive outburst flooding. Santosh Panda accompanied us into the field on numerous occasions and provided preliminary unpublished information on permafrost in the corridor. We thank the other members of the DGGS field crew, especially Kyle Obermiller and Sharon Hansen, for their support in the field and office, and Tom Ratledge for flying us safely in and out of all those tight places. Rod Combellick graciously reviewed this report and provided helpful comments that improved our presentation.

  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?

    State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys
    GIS Data Manager/Cartographer
    3354 College Road
    Fairbanks, AK 99709-3707

    (907) 451-5029 (voice)
    (907) 451-5050 (FAX)
    dggspubs@dnr.state.ak.us

    Contact_Instructions:
    You may view our web site at <http://www.dggs.dnr.state.ak.us> for the latest information on available data.Please e-mail your questions and data requests when possible since our web site and e-mail address will remain current even if our phone number and mailing address change.


Why was the data set created?

This report and map are a part of ADGGS's Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline Geology and Geohazards project, mapping the surificial-geologic deposits along the the Alaska Highway between Delta Junction and Dot Lake. The study was done in anticipation of the proposed natural gas pipeline along the Alaska Highway corridor, to further the geologic understanding of the area andas a basis for evaluating geohazards for proposed infrastructure.


How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?

    Kreig and Reger, 1976 (source 1 of 12)
    Kreig, R.A., and Reger, R.D., 1976, Preconstruction terrain evaluation for the trans-Alaska pipeline project: Dowden, Hutchinson, and Ross, Stroudsburg.

    Other_Citation_Details: in Coates, D.R., ed., Geomorphology and engineering: p. 55–76.
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: Contains terrain evaluation for trans-Alaska oil pipeline

    Kreig and Reger, 1982 (source 2 of 12)
    Kreig, R.A., and Reger, R.D., 1982, Air-photo analysis and summary of landform soil properties along the route of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System: Geologic Report GR-66, Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks AK.

    Other_Citation_Details: 149 p.
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution:
    Contains air-photo analysis and landform soil properties for trans-Alaska oil pipeline

    Pewe and Reger, 1983 (source 3 of 12)
    Péwé, T.L., and Reger, R.D., 1983, Middle Tanana River valley: Guidebook Guidebook 1, Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks AK.

    Other_Citation_Details:
    in Péwé, T.L., and Reger, R.D., eds., Guidebook to permafrost and Quaternary geology along the Richardson and Glenn Highways between Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska, p. 5–45
    This is part of the following larger work.

    Péwé, T.L., ed., and Reger, R.D., ed., 1983, Guidebook to permafrost and Quaternary geology along the Richardson and Glenn Highways between Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska: Guidebook Guidebook 1, Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks AK.

    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: Contains information about Quaternary geology of Tanana Valley

    Carter and Galloway, 1978 (source 4 of 12)
    Carter, L.D., and Galloway, J.P., 1978, Preliminary engineering geologic maps of the proposed natural gas pipeline route in the Tanana River valley, Alaska: Open-file report OFR 78-794, U.S. Geological Survey, United States.

    Other_Citation_Details: 26 p., 3 map sheets, scale 1:125,000
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: engineering geologic maps at 1:125,000

    Carver and others, 2008 (source 5 of 12)
    Carver, G.A., Bemis, S.P., Solie, D.N., and Obermiller, K.E., 200812, Active and potentially active faults in or near the Alaska Highway corridor, Delta Junction to Dot Lake, Alaska: Preliminary Interpretive Report PIR 2008-3D, Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical, Fairbanks AK.

    Other_Citation_Details: 32 p.
    Type_of_Source_Media: online
    Source_Contribution: Source of active faults shown on map sheets 1 and 2

    Duk-Rodkin and others, 2004 (source 6 of 12)
    Duk-Rodkin, Alejandra, Barendregt, R.W., Froese, D.G., Weber, Florence, Enkin, Randy, Smith, I.R., Waters, Pamela, and Klassen, Rudy, 2004, Timing and extent of Plio–Pleistocene glaciations in northwestern Canada: Development in Quaternary Science v.2, Elsevier, New York.

    Other_Citation_Details: p. 313–345
    This is part of the following larger work.

    Ehlers, J., and Gibbard, P.L., 2004, Quaternary glaciations—extent and chronology, part II: North America: Development in Quaternary Science v. 2, Elsevier, New York.

    Other_Citation_Details: p. 313–345
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: Information about timing of glaciation in Canada and Alaska

    Hamilton, 1994 (source 7 of 12)
    Hamilton, T.D., 1994, Late Cenozoic glaciation of Alaska: Geology of North America v. G-1, Geological Society of America, United States.

    Other_Citation_Details: p. 813–844
    This is part of the following larger work.

    Plafker, George, and Berg, H.C., 1994, The Geology of Alaska: Geology of North America v. G-1, Geological Society of America, United States.

    Other_Citation_Details: p. 813–844
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: Late Cenozoic glaciation of Alaska

    Holmes, 1965 (source 8 of 12)
    Holmes, G.W., 1965, Geologic reconnaissance along the Alaska Highway, Delta River to Tok Junction, Alaska: Bulletin 1181-H, U.S. Geological Survey, United States.

    Other_Citation_Details: 19 p., 1 map sheet, scale 1:125,000.
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution:
    Geologic reconnaissance along the Alaska Highway, Delta River to Tok Junction

    Mason and Beget, 1991 (source 9 of 12)
    Mason, O.K., and Begét, J.E., 1991, Late Holocene flood history of the Tanana River, Alaska: Arctic and Alpine Research, United States.

    Other_Citation_Details: v. 23, no. 4, p. 392–403.
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: Holocene flooding in Tanana valley

    Muhs and others, 2003 (source 10 of 12)
    Muhs, D.R., Ager, T.A., Betis, E.A., III, McGeehin, John, Been, J.M., Begét, J.E., Pavich, M.J., Stafford, T.W., Jr., and Stevens, D.S.P, 2003, Stratigraphy and palaeoclimatic signifi cance of late Quaternary loess–palaeosol sequences of the late interglacial–glacial cycle in central Alaska: Quaternary Science Reviews, United States.

    Other_Citation_Details: v. 22, p.1,947–1,986.
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: Loess sequences in central Alaska

    Pewe, 1975 (source 11 of 12)
    Péwé, T.L., 1975, Quaternary geology of Alaska: Professional Paper PP 835, U.S. Geological Survey, United States.

    Other_Citation_Details: 145 p.
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: Quaternary geology of Alaska

    Weber, 1986 (source 12 of 12)
    Weber, F.R., 1986, Glacial geology of the Yukon–Tanana Upland: Alaska Geological Society, Anchorage, Alaska.

    Other_Citation_Details: p. 79–98.
    This is part of the following larger work.

    Hamilton, T.D., ed., Reed, K.M., ed., and Thorson, R.M., ed., 1986, Glaciation in Alaska; The geologic record: Alaska Geological Society, Anchorage, Alaska.

    Other_Citation_Details: p. 79–98.
    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: Glacial geology of the Yukon–Tanana Upland

  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?

    Date: 2007 (process 1 of 5)
    Aerial photograph interpretation- Stereo pairs of ~1:63,360-scale, false-color infrared aerial photographs taken in August 1980 were used to initially map the surficial geology. Unit boundaries were drawn by hand onto acetate overlays, using a magnifying stereoscope. Overlays were registered to aerial photos using tick marks on the photos. Digital aerial photos and scanned overlays were individually orthorectified using Orthomapper 3.6.

    Data sources used in this process:

    • Krieg and Reger, 1976
    • Kreig and Reger, 1982
    • Carter and Galloway, 1978
    • Holmes, 1965

    Date: 2008 (process 2 of 5)
    Digital cartography- The acetate overlays were then individually scanned and orthorectified, using Orthomapper, v. 3.6, and georeferenced. The air-photos were orthorectified, photomosaiced and georeferenced. Map unit boundaries were digitized on-screen into ArcGIS from the orthorectified overlays at a scale more detailed than 1:63,360, using a combination of a USGS topographic 1:63.360 map layer and the orthophotomosaic layer to verify the position of the lines.Surficial geology map polygons and lines were then edited and attributed using ArcMap 9.0.

    Date: 2007 (process 3 of 5)
    Fieldwork - Reconnaissance field work was done in September 2006, during which observations were recorded for use during aerial photograph interpretation. In July-August 2007, field work to verify aerial photograph interpretations was performed. In addition to observations from ground traverses, several soil pits were dug using shovels to maximum depth of 1.3 meters to observe soil profiles, and observations of exposures along river banks and highway cuts were recorded.

    Data sources used in this process:

    • Pewe and Reger, 1983
    • Carver and others, 2008
    • Duk-Rodkin and others, 2004
    • Hamilton, 1994
    • Mason and Beget, 1991
    • Muhs and others, 2003
    • Pewe, 1975
    • Weber, 1986

    Date: 2008 (process 4 of 5)
    Metadata creation - Metadata were assembled by D.N. Solie to FGDC Standards using Metavist 1.2, DGGS 7.05, a data entry program for FGDC metadata with XML output.

    Date: 1969 (process 5 of 5)
    radiocarbon_data - radiocarbon samples were collected by Thomas D. Hamilton during fieldwork in 1969 and analyzed in the 1970's by Geochron Laboratories. Analytical details are not known.

  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?

    Reger, R.D., and Solie, D.N., 200812, Engineering-geology map, Alaska Highway Corriodr, Delta Junction to Dot Lake, Alaska: Preliminary Interpretive Report PIR 2008-3B, Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks AK.

    Other_Citation_Details: 2 sheets, scale 1:63,360
    Reger, R.D., and Solie, D.N., 200809, Reconnaissance interpretation of permafrost, Alaska Highway corridor, Delta Junction to Dot Lake, Alaska: Preliminary Interpretive Report PIR 2008-3C, Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks AK.

    Other_Citation_Details: 10 p., 2 sheets, scale1:63,360
    Carver, G.A., Bemis, S.P., Solie, D.N., and Obermiller, K.E., 200812, Active and potentially active faults in or near the Alaska Highway corridor, Delta Junction to Dot Lake, Alaska: preliminary interpretive report PIR 2008-D, Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks AK.

    Other_Citation_Details: 32 p.
    Solie, D.N., Werdon, M.B., Newberry, R.J., Freeman, L.K., and Lessard, R.R., 200802, Major-oxide, minor-oxide, trace-element and geochemical data from rocks collected in the Alaska Highway corridor, Mount Hayes quadrangle, Alaska in 2006 and 2007: Raw-data File RDF 2008-2, Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks AK.

    Other_Citation_Details: 23 p.


How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?

    Initial reconnaissance field observations were made in 2006, after which surficial geology air-photo interpretations were done. Contacts were hand-drawn, using a magnifying stereoscope, onto acetate air-photo overlays at the scale of the air-photos (approximately inch-to-the-mile). The air-photos were taken in August 1980. During summer field work in 2007, map units were described, samples collected for analysis, and a limited number of test pits was dug. The accuracy of the map unit boundary locations vary due to the scale and interpretive nature of the mapping, but are expected to be accurate to at least 50 ft. Map units labeled with a "?" are considered to have an uncertain assignation. Information from previous geologic reports was incorporated during the interpretation process.

  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?

    The surficial geology was first hand-drawn, using a magnifying stereoscope, onto acetate overlays registered to 1:50,000-scale (nominal) prints of digital aerial photographs. The horizontal accuracy of the map unit boundary locations varies due to the scale and interpretive nature of the mapping, but is expected to be accurate to at least 15 m.The 400dpi digital air photos were orthorectified using OrthoMapper 3.6 with an RMS error generally constrained to be less than 4 pixels, equating to approximately 20 m on the ground, although some areas with rugged terrain have larger errors.The individual orthophotos were mosaicked using Erdas Imagine 9.2 and ArcGIS 9. The acetate overlays were individually scanned and orthorectified using OrthoMapper based on the same equations developed for generating the orthophotos. Map unit boundaries were digitized on-screen into ArcGIS from the orthorectified overlays at a scale of approximately 1:25,000, using a combination of a digital USGS topographic 1:63,360-scale map layer (DRG) and the orthophoto mosaic layer to verify the position of the lines. Total horizontal accuracy of the mapped surficial-geologic contacts is thus on the order of 25 m or better, with somewhat lesser accuracy expected in areas of rugged relief.Coordinates of soil pits and other field sites that are discussed in the text were recorded using a Garmin GPS model 76CSx with a horizontal error of 4 meters or less. Radiocarbon sample localities on sheets 1 and 2 were located by visual transfer of points from hand-drawn figures (T.D. Hamilton, unpublished) and should be considered estimated locations with an accuracy of approximately 120 m or better.

  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?

  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?

    This dataset includes coverages that contain information about the mapped and interpreted surficial-geologic deposits in the map area. Subsurface data were not available for use in creating this map coverage, other than about 10-15 soil pits dug to depths no more than 1.3 m and observations of exposures in gravel pits, highway cuts, and river banks. Soil colors were described using the Munsell soil color charts. The Wentworth scale was used for grain size classification. Soil horizon descriptions in the map area used the U.S. Soil Conservation Service soil taxonomy (Soil Survey Staff, 1975). The radiocarbon analyses shown on Table 2, from T.D. Hamilton (unpublished), were run by Geochron Laboratories in the 1970's. Specific analytical procedures were not reported. The active faults shown on sheets 1 and 2 are more fully described in ADGGS Preliminary Interpretive Report 2008-3d by Carver and others (2008).

  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?

    Polygon topology is present on appropriate coverages; others are line or point coverages.


How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?

Access_Constraints:
This report, map, and/or dataset are available directly from the State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (see contact information below).
Use_Constraints:
Any hard copies or published datasets utilizing these datasets shall clearly indicate their source. If the user has modified the data in any way, the user is obligated to describe the types of modifications the user has made. User specifically agrees not to misrepresent these datasets, nor to imply that changes made by the user were approved by the State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys.

  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)

    State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys
    Natural Resource Technician
    3354 College Road
    Fairbanks, AK 99709-3707
    USA

    907-451-5020 (voice)
    907-451-5050 (FAX)
    dggspubs@alaska.gov

    Hours_of_Service: 8 am to 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday, except State holidays
    Contact_Instructions:
    Please view our Web site (<http://www.dggs.dnr.state.ak.us>) for the latest information on available data. Please contact us using the e-mail address provided above when possible.
  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set?

    Preliminary Interpretive Report PIR 2008-3a

  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?

    The State of Alaska makes no express or implied warranties (including warranties of merchantability and fitness) with respect to the character, function, or capabilities of the electronic services or products or their appropriateness for any user's purposes. In no event will the State of Alaska be liable for any incidental, indirect, special, consequential, or other damages suffered by the user or any other person or entity whether from the use of the electronic services or products, any failure thereof, or otherwise, and in no event will the State of Alaska's liability to the requester or anyone else exceed the fee paid for the electronic service or product.

  4. How can I download or order the data?

  5. What hardware or software do I need in order to use the data set?

    It is suggested that MapInfo users import ESRI shape files (if provided) due to the possibility of data loss when importing Arc Export .e00 files.Please check the MapInfo Web site (<http://www.mapinfo.com/>) for the latest documentation on importing Arc Export and/or ESRI shape files.


Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 05-Dec-2008
Metadata author:
State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys
Metadata Manager
3354 College Road
Fairbanks, AK 99709-3707
USA

907-451-5039 (voice)
907-451-5050 (FAX)
dggspubs@alaska.gov

Hours_of_Service: 8 am to 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday, except State holidays.
Contact_Instructions:
Please contact us through the e-mail address above whenever possible.
Metadata standard:
FGDC Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)


Generated by mp version 2.9.6 on Mon Dec 29 14:22:38 2008